Category Archives: Feature Stories

Four Tigers Receive All-SEC Honors

By Joe Trinacria

While Les Miles and his No. 23 LSU Tigers have been hard at work preparing for their Dec. 30 Music City Bowl matchup against Notre Dame in Nashville, Tennessee, several members of the team have been selected for All-SEC honors by the Associated Press.

Senior left tackle La’el Collins was named to the All-SEC first team, while both junior linebacker Kwon Alexander and senior safety Ronald Martin Jr. made All-SEC second team.

Rounding out the list of honorees for the Tigers was junior offensive guard Vadal Alexander, who was recognized as an honorable mention.

Collins, who was named to the coach’s second team All-SEC last season, stepped up his game in 2014 and anchored the LSU line in the trenches.

Collins was one of the Tigers’ iron men on offense, starting all 12 games and paving the way for LSU to rush for a total of 2,634 yards this year.

Alexander was one of the most feared Tigers on the defensive side of the ball, and rightly so given his excellent playmaking ability.  He led the team with 79 tackles, posting highs in both solo (32) and assisted (47) categories.  Alexander also possessed a strong nose for the ball, contributing two forced fumbles.

Martin is a graduating player that Tiger fans are surely going to miss.  He was one of three LSU players tied with two interceptions this season, none more memorable than when he picked off Ole Miss quarterback Bo Wallace in the closing seconds to preserve the 10-7 upset win over the Rebels.

When he wasn’t causing turnovers (he also had two forced fumbles to go with his interceptions), Martin was laying punishing hits that made opposing receivers think twice about going over the middle.

The loss of Collins on the offensive line will be tough for LSU, however Alexander is ready to follow in his footsteps and take over as leader.

Alexander has the experience as a veteran player, and already was a key cog on the Tiger line this past season.  The one game that Alexander missed for LSU was against Arkansas, which also happened to be the worst rushing performance the Tigers had all season.

The College Football Playoff Bracket is Set

By Lauren Goodman

It is the inaugural season of the College Football Playoffs and the committee has set the final four bracket.

The new format did little to lessen the drama.

In the end, the Ohio State Buckeyes took the fourth seed and are set to take on the No. 1 seed, the Alabama Crimson Tide, in the Allstate Sugar Bowl. The Rose Bowl will host No. 2 Oregon and No. 3 Florida State. Both games will be held on New Year’s Day.

The twelve person selection committee, chaired by Arkansas athletic director Jeff Long, ultimately chose to drop the TCU Horned Frogs from the top four, after they finished the season 11-1 and co-champions of the Big 12.

The conference’s lack of a championship game could be blamed for both TCU and Baylor being left out of the top four. Ohio State’s huge 59-0 win over No. 13 Wisconsin in the Big Ten Championship Game was enough to convince the committee that the Buckeyes deserved a chance to compete for a national championship.

The new playoff format consists of the four teams chosen by the committee playing in the two semifinal games.

The winners will compete for the national championship. This year, that game will take place Jan.12 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

Conference ties to bowl games will be honored for the semifinal games, meaning each year, if ranked in the top four, teams will be matched to their bowl games accordingly.  Conference champions will be placed in the other New Year’s bowls, the Orange, Fiesta, Cotton, and Peach.

This year, No. 5 Baylor takes on No. 8 Michigan State in the Goodyear Cotton Bowl. No. 6 TCU will play No. 9 Ole Miss in the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl.  No. 7 Mississippi State is set to take on No. 12 Georgia Tech in the Capital One Orange Bowl.  The VIZIO Fiesta Bowl will host No. 20 Boise State and No. 10 Arizona.

Alabama, which has been ranked No. 1 since week 13 of the season, finished the regular season 12-1 while facing a tough SEC schedule.

After winning at No. 1-ranked Mississippi State, Alabama began to show why it deserved to compete for a championship. Quarterback Blake Sims’ twenty-six touchdowns, Amari Cooper’s over 1,600 receiving yards, and T.J. Yeldon and Derrick Henry’s 343 combined carries put the Crimson Tide in the top position.

Urban Meyer’s Buckeyes will face their toughest opponent of the season in Alabama in the Allstate Sugar Bowl.

With young players at several positions, including quarterback, Meyer has been able to put together a surprising season.  Their improvement over the season and proving their ability to win despite the hardships their program has seen over the season catapulted them to the top four.

Reigning national champion Florida State is the only undefeated team in the top four.

The program has also had its fair share of troubles this year, but managed to beat a No. 22-ranked Clemson in overtime early in the season and a No. 5-ranked Notre Dame in the final seconds during week seven of the season.

The Seminoles might feel slighted with how they have been perceived during the season, but they have a chance to prove everyone wrong by beating the high-powered offense of Oregon in the Rose Bowl.

The Ducks, led by quarterback Marcus Mariota, a favorite to win the Heisman Trophy, finished the regular season 12-1. Their only loss was to Arizona, who they handily beat 51-13 in their rematch at the Pac-12 Championship Game on Friday night.

Mariota threw for over 3,700 yards and had 14 rushing touchdowns over the season. The Seminoles will have their work cut out for them if they want to make it to the championship game in Arlington.

Tigers Headed to Nashville

By Jessica Busada

The LSU Tigers will play Notre Dame in the Music City Bowl on Dec. 30 at 2 p.m. on ESPN. This will be the first time the Tigers appear in the Music City Bowl.

The Music City Bowl was established in 1998 and this year will mark the 17th annual bowl game. Last years game resulted in a victory for Ole Miss over Georgia Tech.

Before the announcement, LSU athletic ticket manager Brian Broussard said, “We receive 8,000 tickets for the bowl games and currently have requests for 2,500-3,000 total tickets for the game.”

The Tigers and Fighting Irish will meet for the 11th time overall and the fifth time in a bowl game.  Norte Dame finished the season 7-5 and LSU finished 8-4.

The bowl game will be the 15th straight bowl game appearance for LSU.

Senior running back Terrence Magee said, “We are excited about the match up.” Overall reaction to the bowl matchup has been positive from LSU fans and players.

“The bowl took great strides this year to improve our selection process, and I think this year’s match-up proves that it was worth it,” said Toby Wilt, bowl selection committee chairman for the Music City Bowl. “We couldn’t be more excited.”

Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly said, “We’re thrilled with the opportunity to face LSU –one of the preeminent programs in all of college football.”

LSU coach Les Miles reacted to the matchup announcement saying, “We are very excited to bring our football program and the great LSU fan base to Nashville to play Notre Dame in the Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl.

“Notre Dame is a traditional football power and we are looking forward to renewing what has been a tremendous rivalry between the two programs through the years. Nashville is a great city and the opportunity to play in an NFL venue makes this a very attractive bowl destination for us.”

LSU will be the designated home team of the Music City Bowl game. LSU is 5-5 all-time against Notre Dame, including a 2-0 bowl record versus the Fighting Irish.

 

LSU vs. Notre Dame

Coach Les Miles is a Family Man

By Lauren Goodman

 

The LSU Tigers are 8-4. They are ranked No. 24 in the College Football Playoffs and are fifth in the SEC West. They are eager to find out which bowl they will be attending, even if they are not in contention for a national championship, plus the outcome of the search to fill the vacant head coaching position at Michigan.

There is a lot of chatter about coach Les Miles. There is always a lot of chatter about Les Miles.

But there is another side to Coach Miles that the public rarely gets to see, and that is Les Miles, the husband and dad.

Miles has been with his wife Kathy since his coaching days at Michigan. They married in 1993. They are parents to four kids: Kathryn (Smacker), Manny, Benjamin, and Macy Grace.

All four are athletes and play sports. All four understand that their dad is not like the other dads.

It is not always easy to have a coach as a father.

“He understands really quickly where his weaknesses are. He’s not a swim coach,” Kathy Miles says with a chuckle.

The Miles’ oldest daughter, Kathryn, is a swimmer at the University of Texas.

“When they were younger, he would try to coach them on their technique, now he just tries to keep them motivated and on task,” Kathy said.

Manny and Benjamin both play high school football. Having a father who has coached national championship teams should be an advantage.

But Coach Miles does not let his role as head coach of the LSU Tigers compete with his role of being a dad.

“Les understands that the boys are doing what their coaches are teaching them to do,” Kathy said. “And they have some great coaches.”

It is a fine line between coach and father, and Miles walks it well.

Macy Grace, a fifth grader, plays youth soccer and softball. Her dad loves to watch her play.

“He loves meeting the other kids,” Kathy said. “People always ask for photos or autographs. He’s happy to do it. The kids understand. They are independent and understanding when he can’t make it to one of their games.”

Being the wife of an SEC head coach requires a special woman.

“Les gets in a great routine during football season with his staff, practices, game days,” Kathy said. “It makes my job a lot easier. I can just help the kids, finish my errands, and I run lunch up to him about once a week.”

Every football team has its own routine during the season. You would think the intensity of a game every week would be the hardest time of year for a coach’s family, but Kathy says the offseason is much more chaotic.

“Football season seems like down time,” she said. “It’s consistent. After the bowls and in the spring, he is in and out of town to recruit, go on tours, and speaking engagements.”

The idea that being a head coach for a football team is just being busy during the fall is off base. There is always something to prepare for, a recruit to meet, an interview to give.

And then there are the games themselves.

We have all seen the camera zoom in on a coach’s wife and family during the game. Some like to sit in the stands, some in a suite, and some cannot even handle watching the game with other people. Family members have their own routines, too.

“The games are intense for me,” Kathy said. “I am focused on watching the game. There’s not a lot of side chatter for me.”

Kathy said now that their kids are older it is easier to make to all the games.

She has maybe missed one or two away games in the past four years. She makes it to all of the home games, as long as the kids do not have a sporting event of their own.

And what about the Miles’ children? They enjoy watching their dad in Tiger Stadium too.

“When they are older, I think they will appreciate the opportunity they had to go to LSU football games,” Kathy said.

Inevitably, as all coaches do, they lose one of these football games. The scrutiny that head coaches are under, especially in what many consider the best conference in the nation, the SEC, not only affects the coach, but his loved ones, too.

“I’m not an internet person,” Kathy said. “I read The Advocate, always the sports section.  I’ll tell Les about an article. He reads even less than me.”

Criticism doesn’t just come from the media. It comes from the fans, too.

“As far as LSU, the squeaky wheel gets the oil,” Kathy said. “There is always a fan with something to say, positive or negative, but the people of Louisiana have been great to Les and our family. It has been such a positive experience for our family.”

It is not always easy to be in school with a famous father, at least not in the football loving state of Louisiana.

“The kids have grown up with it and are used to it,” Kathy said. “There are down times after losses, but they surround themselves with good friends.  They understand that people will say negative things.”

At the end of the day, these men, who have dedicated their lives to football, to fulfilling their dreams of winning national championships, and helping kids fulfill their dreams of playing in the National Football League, are husbands and fathers.  They are not so different from every other parent trying to figure out how to balance a career and a family.

They show up to work every day, they do their jobs to the best of their ability, they work to showcase the talent of their players, and of course, try to win football games.

But, at the end of the day, they return to their families and play a very different role.

“Les is very involved as a dad,” Kathy said. “He is interested in their grades, school, their social life.”

It is clear that the Miles’ family has learned what is most important.

“To the kids, he is just their dad.”

LSU grad takes career to CBS sports

By Annie Ourso

Sitting at a small table in a Baton Rouge CC’s Coffee House, CBS sports director Mark Grant motioned his arms through the air as if he were conducting a symphony.

“If you watch the guy who conducts a symphony,” he said, “a bunch of different instruments make it all come together. The drums, the woodwinds, the brass – someone has to make it all come together.”

That’s what Grant does, except as a network television sports director.

“I take the camera guys, the camera shots, the replays, the graphics and listen to announcers – somebody has to wrap all that up into a nice little package and make it have some continuity for TV,” he said. “I tell people I’m like the conductor of the orchestra.”

Grant, a Baton Rouge resident and 1981 LSU graduate, has been directing NFL and college football games at CBS for 17 years.

Only 16 people in the country do what he does, Grant said.

Every weekend for seven months, he travels to games across the country. During the games, Grant can be found inside the TV production truck, calling the shots – literally.

“When you watch a game and see a replay, it’s the director who makes that come on the air,” Grant said. “If you see a graphic, it’s the director who says, ‘Put the graphic up.’ Anytime something changes on screen, it’s the director who does that.”

It’s about more than just airing a game, though. For Grant, it’s about telling a story through pictures.

Throughout his career, Grant has told countless stories – some that have stuck with him to this day. The UCLA-Gonzaga game in the 2006 NCAA basketball tournament, Grant said, was one of those stories.

Gonzaga, led by player of the year Adam Morrison, maintained the lead for the first half of the game until UCLA slowly started making a comeback to beat Gonzaga in the final seconds.

“The story wasn’t so much about UCLA winning, but Adam Morrison, player of the year – my camera guy gets a shot of him on the floor, crying,” Grant said. “Here you have this kid, who’s going to be one of the first players taken in the draft, and he’s on the floor crying because his team is out of the tournament. It’s his last college game.

“That shot became an image of what the NCAA basketball tournament is all about – the joy, the pain, the happiness, the sorrow.”

Capturing those moments and emotions are a part of Grant’s job.

Becoming a director, however, doesn’t happen overnight. Grant spent many early years of his career working his way up through the broadcasting ranks.

He said his first job was at a local cable company, covering high school sports.

“Everyone has to start somewhere else,” Grant said. “If you can’t be great there, you can’t be great at the next step.”

While working at the cable company, Grant took side jobs with ESPN when the crew came to town. He said he used the knowledge he gained working for a big network like ESPN to improve his work at the local station.

His efforts did not go unnoticed. Grant moved up to director and producer at the cable company and began to win awards for his work.

“In local cable, you had the CableACE Awards,” he said. “Our company won, and I was producer. I got a lot of recognition. ESPN recognized that I was more than just a camera person.”

In 1986, Grant was hired on at ESPN as an assistant director. When asked to cover college football, he decided to quit his job at the local cable company.

“Since then, I’ve never really looked back,” Grant said.

His next big break came just a few years later.

In 1989, Grant was working a football game in Georgia when the director’s wife went into labor and he had to leave. ESPN needed someone to direct the show.

“To this day, I don’t know how many people they asked till they got to me,” Grant said. “But they finally got to me and asked not only if I wanted to do it, but could I do it. It was my experience doing local cable as a director that got me that opportunity.

Grant proved himself to ESPN, and by 1990, he was promoted to director.

So, how did he get to CBS? Simple. He was offered a better deal.

In 1998, just before signing another contract with ESPN, Grant received a call from his agent. He told Grant to hold off on signing with ESPN because CBS got the rights back to broadcast the NFL and was looking for directors.

After a phone call and an interview, Grant said, CBS wanted him as a director and haggled with ESPN over who could make the better offer. CBS won out.

“You can’t get comfortable working for one company in a competitive business,” Grant said. “For a lot of reasons, it was a better move for me. Seventeen years later, here I am, doing what I do, and I love it.”

What’s funny, Grant said, is that what he loves most about his job is also what he hates about his job.

“I’m fortunate in that I’ve been all over the world covering sports,” he said. “I’ve met people who are friends for life because I cover sports. I’ve seen cities I never would have. That part of traveling is great, but the day-to-day grind of getting up, packing a suitcase, unpacking and flying – that part of the travel is what I hate most about my job.”

Grant admitted he did not always want to work in television. He started out as a pre-med student at LSU but soon decided that wasn’t for him.

He laughed as he told the story of how he got into mass communications: It was a girl who sparked his interest, not the actual field itself. Grant wanted to be in her major, broadcast journalism, to spend more time with her.

“Once I got into the major, I was fascinated by what goes on in television, especially behind the scenes,” Grant said. “I never really wanted to be on camera, but I just loved editing and writing and putting it all together.”

One of Grant’s classmates at LSU’s Manship School of Mass Communication was Steve Schneider, the local WAFB sports director. After graduation, Grant and Schneider worked together at the local cable company.

“Mark used to joke that he’d get assigned to cover city council meetings, and they were so boring that they just drove him to excellence, to succeed at something more,” Schneider said. “He excelled. He was determined to learn every part of the business.”

For that, Grant has become well respected in the community, Schneider said, and someone he personally admires.

“I think he’s one of those good people – always stood for the right things, always going out of his way to help people,” Schneider said.

Grant stays involved with the Manship School, teaching classes in broadcasting when he can, and also helps out at the local Cox Sports Television cable channel.

“I like to teach people locally,” Grant said. “I like to help them get to a higher level. It’s rewarding.”

His continued involvement at LSU and in the local community earned Grant a spot in the Manship School’s Hall of Fame.

David Kurpius, LSU’s associate vice chancellor for enrollment management and former Manship School professor, nominated Grant to be inducted in 2003.

Kurpius said Hall of Fame members should be professionals in the field who are still engaged with LSU and the Manship School.

“Mark’s fabulous,” Kurpius said. “He’s had a really great career as director for ESPN and CBS. He also gives back to the school. He’s actively involved in teaching students, getting students to the next level and helping them get jobs and internships.”

It’s easy to relate to the students, Grant said, because he’s been in their shoes and he knows what it takes to get to the next level: hard work.

You have to pay your dues, he said, and really believe and make others believe that you are the best at what you do.

“There are hundreds of people who would like the do what I do,” Grant said. “I do the NFL every Sunday. Only 16 people in the country do what I do, but there are a lot of people, thousands, who could do it and want to do it.”

Grant’s job, then, is to continue performing at such a high level that CBS thinks he’s one of the only who can do it.

“As long as I do that, I have a job,” Grant said. “But the minute I lose my edge and my passion and start taking the easy way and don’t prepare for games – that’s when you start to fall. And when you do, there’s someone more hungry than you.”

Keep the Class Leave the Trash

By: Serena Crawford

It’s safe to say that the SEC has some of the most passionate fans in College Football. Some may say that this passion can be considered as a gift and a curse. Remember this guy by the name of Harvey Updyke who decided to poison the trees at Toomer’s Corner on Auburn’s campus. Destroying a tradition for an entire university, because of an Alabama lost. Most recently the Ole Miss fan that was caught on camera ranting, and crying hysterically about the Ole Miss lost. During previous years many fans, especially at LSU take certain losses very personal. In 1994 former LSU QB Jamie Howard threw five interceptions during a lost against Auburn. Howard received death threats, and his experience with such vial scrutiny at LSU lead him to actually move away.

On Nov. 15, LSU suffered a tough lost vs. Arkansas, an annual rivalry that fans look forward to at the end of each season. LSU currently leads the rivalry 37-21. However as many SEC fans know for the past 3 years Arkansas’s football program has fallen short of meeting SEC powerhouse expectations. Although the part that hurt many fans the worst, is the fact that Arkansas was on the path of a losing season, until the 17—0 shutout vs. LSU on this unfortunate Saturday night.

Unfortunately post game things took an ugly turn on social media. It’s known that many fans after a lost find a way to let out their frustration. Most fans choose to focus on a particular individual whether it be a player or coach to direct their anger towards and to blame. This time it was LSU’s QB Anthony Jennings. This hasn’t been the first time that Jennings has experienced some type of scrutiny from fans, from being chanted and booed off the field, to receiving nasty tweets on Twitter. Although this time fans, if people could actually call them that, took things to extreme levels. Those tweets will not be quoted in this article due to the explicit content, and the fact that dirt such as those tweets don’t deserve to be replicated.

Jennings who is only age 20 and only a sophomore at LSU, received death threats after the lost vs. Arkansas. Many so call fans took to twitter, threatening to take his life, expressing how bad of a player he is, and taking every stab at his confidence that they could. Yes people have a right to their own opinion and everyone has the right to the freedom of speech. Although many forget that these players or still human just like the fans. An athlete such as Jennings works hard day in and day out to make LSU fans proud, from two-a-days, weightlifting, hours of studying video, and let’s not forget that he is a student first. Which includes him attending class full time and outside tutoring numerous days out of the week. Even with the scrutiny throughout this entire season Jennings still had the respect for LSU, his teammates, and the fans to put on his uniform, and go out on the field and play. Surely there were times he probably would rather just sit on the bench than to take on offensive scrutiny.

So shouldn’t there be a bit more respect for a guy who still goes out on the field and play for fans who may not always support him. Because true fans should love their team win or lose. Taking drastic measures by threatening someone’s life won’t turn a lost in to a win because what’s done is done. Fans should probably take a step back and realize that if Jennings can still go on the field and play for fans who scrutinize him, that those same fans should be able to still support him after a lost. There are other things that actually deserve a lot more scrutiny than Jennings, like the fact that gas is still not a $1.75. That’s something to really be upset about. Fans should realize that kicking someone while their down doesn’t help anyone feel better. Jennings deserves much more respect than having his life threatened over losing a game, try taking a walk in his cleats. Tiger fans let’s show the world more class than trash. Think about it even though Harvey Updyke was completely wrong for poisoning those trees, he wasn’t trying to hurt his own team. So stop the threats and show support.

Cajuns’ success prompts expansion, grows fan base

By Annie Ourso

It’s a good time to be a Ragin’ Cajun, said Louisiana-Lafayette sports information director Matt Sullivan.

Cajun Field has seen substantial renovations this year, football ticket sales and donations are at all-time highs, and after six straight wins, the Cajuns are bowl eligible for the fourth consecutive year.

“We’ve got consistent winning seasons, so what you’re going to see now is growth – in terms of community support, donations, everything,” Sullivan said. “You have to have the right person, the right scenario, and I think with head coach (Mark) Hudspeth coming in, things were able to take off.”

Since the Hudspeth Era began in 2011, the Cajuns have won three straight bowl game championships – a complete turnaround from lackluster seasons of years past.

With the Cajuns’ newfound success came more support and more money, and with more support and more money came facility improvements.

Cajun Field received a major makeover for the start of the 2014 football season.

Seating was added to the south end of the stadium, increasing capacity to 36,900. UL-Lafayette also installed a new video board, three times the size of the previous board, and added two outdoor patio suites on the southwest end.

John Dugas, associate athletics director, said this is the first time Cajun Field has seen improvements on this level since it opened in 1971.

The stadium upgrade is part of Tier 1 of UL-Lafayette’s three-tiered, $115 million Athletic Facilities Master Plan.

Further expansions for Cajun Field are in the works, Sullivan said, as UL-Lafayette’s fan base continues to grow.

“Since Coach Hud, we’ve more than doubled our season ticket output,” said Matt Casbon, UL-Lafayette’s ticket manager.

This year alone, Casbon said, football season ticket sales have risen 36 percent. Overall attendance at games has increased as well.

“Attendance has been great these last four years,” Sullivan said. “Two of the last three years, we’ve led the Sun Belt Conference in attendance. We have a chance to lead it again this year. Right now, we’re right behind Arkansas State.”

Donations to the Ragin’ Cajun Athletics Foundation also rose this year to about $2 million for the first time, he said.

Even as a newcomer to the athletics staff, Sullivan said he has seen progress across the board at UL-Lafayette.

“I’ve been here for a year,” he said. “I was born in Lafayette, and I haven’t been back in 30 years. Seeing everything now, I’ve been amazed. The growth and everything going on with football and Coach Hud, it’s been phenomenal – a tremendous four-year ride.”

Dugas has been with the Cajuns through the long haul, and he said these last four years have been nothing short of a dream come true.

“This is my 21st season being a part of the Ragin’ Cajuns football program,” Dugas said. “This is more than a team to me; it’s truly part of who I am.”

Hudspeth was the spark the Cajuns needed to turn the program around, Dugas said, and his flame has spread throughout the entire university and city of Lafayette.

“Hope is a powerful motivator,” he said. “More than anything, Coach Hud represents what is possible for this team and this athletic department.

“We’ve had brief moments of success in the past, but nothing that has been sustained. We have everyone on board now, so the time to completely transform has arrived. It’s up to us to keep it going.”

Classless

By Jessica Busada

Tiger Stadium is known as one of the greatest stadiums to play and watch college football. The experience of a game in Tiger Stadium is one that is hard to forget.

The student section has always been one of the best in college sports but that opinion may change soon. In the Tigers final home game of the season against Alabama the student section was classless.

Close to the end of a tough game, the students began chanting “F*** You Saban” loud and clear for not only those in attendance to hear but also everyone watching on CBS. This is completely classless and embarrassing for multiple reasons.

During this vulgar chant the students failed to notice one of our own players was down on the field hurt.

When a player, especially from your team, is hurt fans should be quiet and the music should stop. Our students decided it was more important to chant about a coach that has been gone from our school for ten years.

The injured player during that time deserves an apology from the student section. The amount of disrespect shown at that moment was disturbing.

Everyone knows LSU fans do not like Saban, but it is time to get over it and move on. The chant only made us look bitter and classless.

At a point in the game where our players needed the fans more than ever this chant started and it hyped up the Alabama players not ours. We should be cheering on our team and coach and motivating them.

The majority of the students chanting probably have no idea why they hate Saban.  They were kids when he coached at LSU and most probably paid no attention at that time.

The students are hurting the brand of LSU as a whole. It is incredibly embarrassing and has absolutely no benefit.

The chant was an insult to our players, coaches and staff. They are working hard to make the fans happy and get the win but their own student section is cheering about the opponent’s coach.

Those chanting are not true LSU football fans and are ruining the experience in Tiger Stadium that has been known as the best for years. Families attend and watch the games and children are hearing these loud obscene chants. Parents did not pay for their kids to hear this and should not have to listen to it.

Players want their fans cheering for them, helping them gain energy and motivation throughout the game. This disgusting chant is not what that want to hear, it does not help the players at all.

The Saban chant was a gift to the Alabama players because it gave them a boost of energy and more motivation to win. Look who came away with the win in overtime, not LSU.

Congratulations students you have successfully embarrassed the university you claim to love, disrespected your team especially the player who was down with an injury and the entire coaching staff.

2014-15 LSU Football Home Games

By Jessica Busada

Gallery: “SEC Nation” Cast Holds Media Session

By Kyle Huber

 

On Friday evening, the eve of the LSU-Alabama game, some of the cast of ESPN’s “SEC Nation” took questions from the media. Those who partook in the session were Joe Tessitore, Tim Tebow, and Marcus Spears

"SEC Nation" makes its way to Baton Rouge

“SEC Nation” makes its way to Baton Rouge

With Tiger Stadium as the backdrop, the "SEC Nation" cast is set to begin a segment.

With Tiger Stadium as the backdrop, the “SEC Nation” cast is set to begin a segment

The segment as begun.

The segment as begun

This segment features Joe Tessitore, former Florida quaterback Tim Tebow, former LSU Tiger Marcus Spears

This segment features Joe Tessitore, former Florida quaterback Tim Tebow, former LSU Tiger Marcus Spears

Joe Tessitore and Tim Tebow discuss the atmosphere in Tiger Stadium

Joe Tessitore and Tim Tebow discuss the atmosphere in Tiger Stadium

Tim Tebow gives his opinions on the LSU and Alabama key players

Tim Tebow gives his opinions on the LSU and Alabama key players

Only a few fans were out at the "SEC Nation" set Friday evening. This fan chose to show is support for LSU offensive lineman La'el Collins

Only a few fans were out at the “SEC Nation” set Friday evening. This fan chose to show his support for LSU offensive lineman La’el Collins

Joe Tessitore speaks with media on his excitement to be in Baton Rouge

Joe Tessitore speaks with media on his excitement to be in Baton Rouge

Former LSU defensive lineman Marcus Spears expresses to the media how much has enjoyed switching to broadcasting

Former LSU defensive lineman Marcus Spears expresses to the media how much he has enjoyed switching to broadcasting

Tim Tebow discusses with the media his experiences in Tiger Stadium and with the LSU fans

Tim Tebow discusses with the media his experiences in Tiger Stadium and with the LSU fans

This production box has the "SEC Nation" stamp of approval

This production box has the “SEC Nation” stamp of approval

A graphic that depicts the states that make up "SEC Nation"

A graphic that depicts the states that make up “SEC Nation”

The "SEC Nation" tour bus parked next to the set

The “SEC Nation” tour bus parked next to the set

The institutions that make up the SEC on the side of the "SEC Nation" bus

The institutions that make up the SEC on the side of the “SEC Nation” bus

The set for side segments for "SEC Nation"

The set for side segments for “SEC Nation”

A fan's view of the "SEC Nation" set

A fan’s view of the “SEC Nation” set

The majestic backdrop for the "SEC Nation" set, a great view of Tiger Stadium

The majestic backdrop for the “SEC Nation” set, a great view of Tiger Stadium

The sun has begun to set in the Western sky, and soon it will be Friday night in Death Valley

The sun has begun to set in the Western sky, and soon it will be Friday night in Death Valley